art history

Add it up...

Here is the best description of "additive painting" I have ever read-

"Traditional ways of seeing pictures could roughly be fitted into two categories: the additive and the overall. The additive relates part to part in larger and larger units which eventually add up to the entire painting... Systems of checks and balances inflect each other until the "right" moment halts the process and freezes the picture. The general effect- the additive synthesis- then clarifies the picture, within which little pictures happily reside. Instructed by the parent picture, the eye is invited to make its own compositions within, finding pictures within pictures, details within details, before withdrawing to lock everything in again with the full glance at the parent picture."

 

O'Doherty, B. (1973). American Masters- the Voice and the Myth. New York, NY: Random House. p.198

Mind the gap...

"This book attempts to recognize and clarify a dialogue inseparable from modernism: that between an artist and his work on the one hand, and the audience on the other. There are large areas here for misunderstanding. The artist's intention does not always guide his work into its most worthwhile context. The work itself offers different complexions to contemporary- and succeeding- audiences."

O'Doherty, B. (1973). American Masters- the Voice and the Myth. New York, NY: Random House. p.6

Art and money...

"Nevertheless, the conflation of art, fashion, and money troubled me. This was not the art world I grew up in. I must admit that I enjoyed the partying, but in the back of my mind I kept asking myself, what were these chic, new rich collectors responding to in art, or rather, what were they using it for? Hip life-style? Status? Social climbing? Entertainment? Nostalgie de la boue? Titillation? Investment? Were they responding to what moved me? Was I impressed by their money? Was I bothered that, because of their money, more and more of them were invited to serve on boards of museums and other art institutions? Did they deserve their taste-making power in shaping the art-world consensus about what art was significant and of quality at any moment? Yes, I was bothered. The motives of the new collectors often did not serve the ends of art."

Sandler, I. (2003). A Sweeper -Up After Artists. New York, NY: Thames and Hudson. p. 300